Session 5 Production

Production Project TEMPLATE

SUMMARY

Role: Cinematographer

Intention (SMART Goal): By May 10th, as part of team 1, I will have provided evidence for CAMERA MOTION and provide evidence for the justification of camera motion, by using the “The Ultimate Guide to Camera Movement” by StudioBinder.

PRE-PRODUCTION – INQUIRY

Leader(s) in the Field / Exemplary Work(s): Gregory Middleton – Working on Moon Knight, also worked on Game of Thrones.

Training Source(s): Ultimate Guide to Camera Motion Discusses nearly every way to use motion for different uses.

Project Timeline: 1 week to film, 3 days to edit / ADR if needed

Proposed Budget: https://youtu.be/l91ISfcuzDw

PRODUCTION – ACTION

The (FILM, SOUND, or GAME Creation)

Skills Commentary

POST-PRODUCTION – REFLECTION

21st Century Skills

Ways of Thinking (Creativity, Innovation, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving)

Ways of Working (Communication & Collaboration)

Tools for Working (Info & Media Literacy)

Ways of Living in the World (Life & Career)

Reactions to the Final Version

Self-Evaluation of Final Version

Grammar and Spelling

Editor

Story of Visuals; Research of Structure

Visual Story Structure Research TEMPLATE

Seven Visual Story Components

Cue Notes
Space
Line and Shape
Tone
Color
Movement
Rhythm

Summary

 

Resources

Session 4 Production Blog Post

Production Project TEMPLATE

SUMMARY

Role: Cinematographer

Intention (SMART Goal): By March 2nd, as part of team 2, I will explore the cinematographer’s skill pathway by following The Visual Story by Bruce Block and will have created scenes that demonstrate the visual story structure of space.

PRE-PRODUCTION – INQUIRY

Leader(s) in the Field / Exemplary Work(s)

I used Parker Finn’s short film “The Hidebehind” as both partial inspiration for the shot as well as for it’s use of camera techniques to relay the supernatural powers of an entity, and it’s chase scene.

 

  • David Klein – The Mandalorian.  His use of camera movement to make scenes feel tense and alive, as well as the intensity conveyed through them

Training Source(s)

  • The Visual Story by Bruce Block – Focus on learning how space is important, and how to utilize it.  It is possible to control space by choosing a fitting shot location alongside changing said location and the camera positions to correctly display illusory depth, as well as coordinating movement to achieve the same effect.

  • The Visual Story

Project Timeline

February 18 Brainstorm, Write Script
February 23 Finish script
February 24 Film Scenes
February 25 Continue Filming Scenes
February 28 Record ADR
March 1 Compose Music
March 2 Edit Scenes
March 3 Create slideshow, Continue editing
March 4 Finish Editing

Proposed Budget

none

PRODUCTION – ACTION

https://drive.google.com/file/d/13xByHCXNZsxRvmB73C53sFsRKr9hRhg7/view?usp=sharing

The Shoe Goblin

Skills Commentary

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1t8v1zrEnytwyiI9J4Nre2C65_2X3WNUa0wUHCeiYLuE/edit?usp=sharing

In this session, I was in charge of camera work and cinematography in the film. I used 1 camera, selected shot locations, and came up with good shot types for the scenes.  The director and I collaborated on the different shot styles and story, as well as how to best portray it.

POST-PRODUCTION – REFLECTION

21st Century Skills

Ways of Thinking (Creativity, Innovation, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving)

My shot choices were creative with the way to use our available resources to create scenes with supernatural elements.

Ways of Working (Communication & Collaboration)

I worked with the actors to explain where to stand and how to act with the camera.

Tools for Working (Info & Media Literacy)

I learned about the multiple visual story elements using the book The Visual Story by Bruce Block.

Ways of Living in the World (Life & Career)

I can use what I learned for future projects as well as to analyze movies I watch for fun.

Reactions to the Final Version

There were comments on the clever seamless shot at the end of the film.

Self-Evaluation of Final Version

One of my favorite shots wasn’t used due to editing constraints, which I feel lowered the overall quality.  However, overall I liked it.

What I Learned and Problems I Solved

I learned about the importance of recharging your batteries in your cameras, as well as solved problems regarding good shots with some flaws continuity wise.

Grammar and Spelling

Grammarly.

Editor

Awaiting

Session 3 Production Project

Horror Travis & Scott Production Project

“horror” by wolfgangfoto is licensed under CC BY-ND 2.0

SUMMARY

Role

Intention (SMART Goal)

PRE-PRODUCTION – INQUIRY

Leader(s) in the Field / Exemplary Work(s)

Training Source(s)

Project Timeline

Proposed Budget

PRODUCTION – ACTION

The (FILM, SOUND, or GAME Creation)

Skills Commentary

POST-PRODUCTION – REFLECTION

21st Century Skills

Ways of Thinking (Creativity, Innovation, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving)

Ways of Working (Communication & Collaboration)

Tools for Working (Info & Media Literacy)

Ways of Living in the World (Life & Career)

Reactions to the Final Version

Self-Evaluation of Final Version

What I Learned and Problems I Solved

Grammar and Spelling

Editor

Production Section Session 2

“Movie Theater Cleaning” by roeyahram is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

SUMMARY

Role:

I was the cinematographer for this cycle.

Intention (SMART Goal)

Specific: I will learn to utilize intentional lighting as well as good camera focus.  This is important because good films have both of these qualities.

Measurable: I will measure progress by talking with my teammates and comparing between different set ups and camera settings.

Achievable: I have the skills to achieve this goal.  I have steady hands, experience with cameras and lighting from designing games (and playing them), and a good eye for detail.  This goal requires a decent amount of effort, and I intend to complete it for good grades and experience with film.

Relevant: I am setting this goal because I want to become a better cinematographer and learn new skills for my roles and life.

Time-Bound: The deadline is in the past now, but it was realistic.  It is not a class restraint, it was a personal restraint that kept me from completing it.

PRE-PRODUCTION – INQUIRY

Leader(s) in the Field / Exemplary Work(s)

Dean Cundey – Cinematographer for The Book of Boba Fett: Dean Cundey has been a cinematographer in a lot of movies, but has also been hired for Disney’s newest tv series, and considering the success of The Mandalorian, they are probably going to go for a safe bet, which gives credit to Dean Cundey.

Training Source(s)

Project Timeline

Proposed Budget

PRODUCTION – ACTION

The (FILM, SOUND, or GAME Creation)

Skills Commentary

POST-PRODUCTION – REFLECTION

21st Century Skills

Ways of Thinking (Creativity, Innovation, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving)

Ways of Working (Communication & Collaboration)

Tools for Working (Info & Media Literacy)

Ways of Living in the World (Life & Career)

Reactions to the Final Version

Self-Evaluation of Final Version

What I Learned and Problems I Solved

Grammar and Spelling

Editor

IB Comparative Study Worksheet 2020-21

 

“Film scripts for sale in Soho! #newyork #newyorkcity #nyc #movies” by Nat Ireland is licensed under CC BY-NC 2.0

Summary

A guide to planning, researching, and creating your Film Comparative Study

  • Follow the directions for each step below
  • Include for your work where it is required

Student Work

Guidance for Your Work

 

“Simple formative analysis of film elements, no matter how precise or insightful, won’t cut it which is why the research question needs to be crafted in such a way that it provides scope for theoretical and socio-historic exploration. It’s basically an EE in disguise but focusing on two very different textual sources.”

Steps and Tasks

  1. Brainstorm possible films for the task. You must select TWO films from contrasting cultural contexts.
  2. Brainstorm and justify at least three different areas of FILM FOCUS for your two chosen films.
  3. Brainstorm and justify at least two different CULTURAL CONTEXTS for your two chosen films.
  4. Consolidate your ideas and develop at least three different RESEARCH QUESTION topics for your study.
  5. Finalize your choices and select your RESEARCH QUESTION. Choose two films for comparison.
  6. Develop the main arguments you will make about your topic.
  7. Collect evidence from the films that support your argument.
  8. Research secondary sources for information that supports your argument.
  9. Write your Narration and plan the audio-visual components of your video essay.
  10. Recordassemble, and edit your Comparative Study Video Essay.
  11. Create a Works Cited document (separately) once your Comparative Study is finished.

Comparative Study Task Components

For this assessment task, each student identifiesselects, and researches each of the following task components.

  1. TASK 1: One area of film focus.
  2. TASK 2: Two films for comparison from within the chosen area of film focus, one of which originates from a contrasting time (historical) or space (geographical) to the personal context of the student, and the other film identified for comparison must arise from a contrasting cultural context to the first film. Students are required to select films they have not previously studied in depth. The selected films cannot come from the prescribed list of film texts provided for the textual analysis assessment task and, once selected, the films cannot be used by the student in any other assessment task for the DP film course or the extended essay.
  3. TASK 3: A clearly defined topic for a recorded multimedia comparative study, which links both the selected films and the identified area of film focus. Each student should invest time in researchingdeveloping, and honing their topic (which in most cases is likely to be expressed in the form of a research question) to ensure it is clear, focused and concise, in order to provide them with the maximum potential for success in this task. The topic should seek to enrich the student’s understanding of the chosen area of film focus and should avoid a plot-driven approach to the comparison.

The assessment criteria for this task requires students to provide a strong justification for the choice of task components as part of the recorded multimedia comparative study. This includes the student’s justification for how films arise from contrasting cultural contexts.

1. FILM Choices List

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  20 min
Which films are you considering for your final Comparative Study? List as many as you wish below as part of an initial brainstorm. Remember that you must select ​​TWO​​ films from contrasting cultural contexts for this task.

e.g. CITIZEN KANE

Year, Country, and Director of the film.

e.g. 1941, USA, Dir: Orson Welles

Robocop 1987, USA, Paul Verhoeven
Robocop (2014) 2014, USA
Inuyashiki 2018, Japan

2. Areas of FILM FOCUS

Film Focus Possibility – identify the broad focus area and then add specifics (e.g. “THEORY – Auteur theory” or “GENRE – Horror”). Develop at least THREE options…you can create more by adding more rows. Justification for this Film Focus. Be as specific as possible.
GENRE – Sci-fi Both of the films deal with human augmentation and cybernetic replacement after an accident.
THEORY – Narrative Both of the movies deal with the enhanced protagonist rising up against another powerful mechanical force, then beating them.
GENRE – Sci-fi Exploring how the different cultures explore needed cybernetic augmentation would be an interesting comparison.

3. Chosen CULTURAL CONTEXT

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 

For this assessment task, “cultural context” involves consideration of some of the following factors, some of which may be blended (such as socioeconomic factors).

  • Economic, Geographical, Historical, Institutional, Political, Social, Technological
Identify at least TWO Cultural Context possibilities for your chosen films.
Justification for this Cultural Context. Be as specific as possible.
Geographical Context One of the movies is in Japan, and one of them is in the U.S.  They both are made around the same time, which means that it will be primarily geographical rather than time periods influencing the difference.
Socioeconomic Context Both Japan and the USA are capitalist systems, but the social differences will be an interesting comparison.

4. RESEARCH QUESTION Possibilities

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 

Consolidate your thoughts above and develop at least ​THREE​​ different research question possibilities. More are possible by adding additional rows to the table below. FYI these will be shared with the full class for discussion of strengths and weaknesses.

Your Chosen Area of Film Focus Topic for Comparative Study (written as a research question)
GENRE – Sci-fi Inside their respective universes, how does the Japanese public view cybernetically enhanced humans compared to how the U.S. views them?
THEORY – Narrative To what extent did the movies explore the protagonist(s) reactions to their new forms?
GENRE – Sci-fi To what extent did the movies highlight the importance of retaining their humanity?

5. Final Decisions

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 

Using your topic options in the table above, select ​ONE​​ to be your final topic for this Comparative Study task. NOTE: There are examples from the IB of what this should look like below this table.

Your Chosen Area of Film Focus Film 1 Film 2 Contrasting Cultural Context Topic for Comparative Study practice task (written as a research question)
THEORY – Narrative RoboCop 2014 Inuyashiki Geographical Context To what extent did the movies explore the protagonist(s) reactions to their new forms?

6. Developing Your Topic

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 
Develop 3-5 main arguments that can be made about your topic based on your research question and chosen film focus. Brainstorm how you could support these arguments within your video essay.

7. Selecting Supporting Evidence (Primary)

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 
Identify at least 15 scenes from your chosen films that will help support the arguments you have outlined above. Screen clip a frame from each scene below. Write notes about how this scene helps support your argument. (These notes will help form your voice-over narration.)

*Add more rows as needed.

8. Selecting Supporting Evidence (Secondary)

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 
Identify at least 3-5 secondary sources (articles, books, websites, video essays, etc.) which provide information that help support your arguments being made. In this column include the specific source citations. Summarize the detailed information from the secondary source that you can use in this column. (You can copy+paste if they are from online sources.)

*Add more rows as needed.

9. Writing Your Narration

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend on the first draft: ? 
  • How much time did you spend on the final draft: ? 

Using the information, scene choices, and external sources you have compiled in steps 6-8, you will now write your voiceover narration and match it up to your chosen visual examples.

Length (</= 10 Minutes)

  • For the final Comparative Study, your narration should be no longer than 10 minutes in length.

Remember that you need to:

  • COMPARE and CONTRAST your two chosen film using the arguments and evidence you identified in parts 6-8, above
  • Begin your narration with a detailed justification for the chosen cultural contrast
  • Use an equal balance of the two selected films.
  • Write in a third-person voice to construct your argument (similar in tone to your Extended Essay and other
    comparative analytical work you have written in Film class).
  • Identify where any WRITTEN TEXT will appear on the screen and highlight this (to reference during the
    creation/editing stage)
Which Visual Evidence/Scenes line up to this part of the narration? Voiceover Narration Ideas

Formatting Guidelines

Screenshot from Celtx.com

10. Assembling the Comparative Study

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 

Now you will collect all media resources needed for the task and construct your video essay.

REQUIRED STEPS

  • Import the digital copy of your chosen films into editing software
  • Identify and extract chosen scenes and clips
  • Place and edit clips into a rough timeline for your video essay
  • Record audio narration (both partners should participate in narrating this practice task)
    into an audio file using recording equipment (Zoom recorders, iPhone, DSLR Rode video
    mic, etc.)
  • Import your recorded narration audio file into your project timeline
  • Assemble, edit and fine-tune clips and narration until your video essay takes shape
  • Create and add any required textual information in the timeline (including black slate at the start)
  • Audio mixing of narration and movie clips (adjust levels so that narration and movie sounds complement each other)
  • Export the final video essay movie file
    • Upload Unlisted draft to YouTube for peer review

11. Create Works Cited

  • Set a timer
  • How much time did you spend:  ? 
  • Create Works Cited document separately (Google Doc)

Examples of Possible Task Components

Area of film focus Film 1 Film 2 A possible topic for comparative study
Film movement: German Expressionism The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (1920) Edward Scissorhands (1990) How and with what effect are specific film elements of German expressionism used within a chosen contemporary film?
Film movement: French New Wave Breathless (1960) Badlands (1973) The influence of the French New Wave on New Hollywood’s use of innovative film elements in its representation of youth and violence.
Film genre and film style: Black comedy No. 3 (1997) The Big Lebowski (1998) To what extent do “black comedy” films differ according to cultural context?
Film theory: Soviet Montage Battleship Potemkin (1925) Koyaanisqatsi (1982) To what extent are specific features of Soviet montage theory faithfully employed in a contemporary experimental film?

External Assessment Criteria SL and HL

Peer Review Checklist

 

TASK COMPONENTS (ACTION) Notes / Suggestions
__ Assemble Findings
__ Develop a personal and critically reflective perspective
__ Identify and gather appropriate audio-visual material to support the study
SCREENPLAY
__ Justify the chosen topic and selected films
__ Make sure that the text is in a formal academic register (can be in the 1st person)
__ The balance between visual and spoken elements
__ Make clear reference to your sources as on-screen citations (text on-screen)
__ Make sure the primary weight of evidence for the study from the two chosen films
__ Make sure each film is given equal consideration
__ Make sure film language information is communicated clearly throughout (avoid “to be” verbs – make statements like “blah is this.”)
__ Make sure information is communicated logically rooted in film language
__ Have another student highlight the WHAT WHY HOW in your draft screenplay
VIDEO ESSAY
__ Recorded voice and edited commentary numerous times until happy with the material
__ Make sure your name and the school’s name ARE NOT IN THE ESSAY
__ Make sure to have 10-second title card with:

1. Area of film focus

2. Titles of the two films for comparison

3. The chosen topic

__ Include breaks in your recorded commentary to enable other audio-visual material included in the study to be clearly heard (if needed)
__ Make sure film clip length matches points being made
__ Make sure still images have citations on-screen if you have them
__ Make sure text on-screen is legible and spelled correctly
__ Make sure information is communicated audibly (levels are good for all sound)
__ Make sure information is communicated visually appropriate manner
__ Make sure background music is from Creative Commons and is cited
__ Make sure edits are clean
__ Make sure the presentation is 10 minutes maximum, including title card and credits
__ Make sure two films are listed in sources

Production Project – Senior Year 1

Production Project TEMPLATE

“Spooky, Creepy, Frightful, Sinister, Eerie, Macabre, Scary” by ShellyS is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA 2.0

SUMMARY

Role: Cinematographer

Intention (SMART Goal)

PRE-PRODUCTION – INQUIRY

Leader(s) in the Field / Exemplary Work(s)

Training Source(s)

Project Timeline

Proposed Budget

PRODUCTION – ACTION

The (FILM, SOUND, or GAME Creation)

Skills Commentary

POST-PRODUCTION – REFLECTION

21st Century Skills

Ways of Thinking (Creativity, Innovation, Critical Thinking, Problem Solving)

Ways of Working (Communication & Collaboration)

Tools for Working (Info & Media Literacy)

Ways of Living in the World (Life & Career)

Reactions to the Final Version

Self-Evaluation of Final Version

What I Learned and Problems I Solved

Grammar and Spelling

Editor